12/08/2014

Books You USED to Love {The Birdie Musings}



Can you fall out of love with a book?

I recently saw a really negative review of a book I read years ago and used to adore. So I decided to pull it out from the dusty corners of my bookshelves and give it a glance, just for the heck of it.


I'd defended my liking of this book when I'd seen the review. I'd mentioned how awesome it was. But once I went back and read it . . . I realised I actually didn't like it any more. Awkward.


It's not that I hated it. I didn't pick it up and say, 'THIS IS THE MOST TERRIBLE PIECE OF TRASH EVER WTF'. I just re-read a few bits, including old chapters I knew I'd loved and felt . . . well, nothing.

The writing left a lot to be desired, the characters annoyed me and the plot was a little boring. It was no longer the four-star read I'd once thought it was.

So that got me thinking! What made this book fall down a few pegs for me? Is it simply because I've matured (HAH)? Is it because my tastes are changing? Or is it because I've been reading so many good books lately, that I'm starting to grade on a curve?

This book is one I'd read a few years ago (I won't name it, because I think that'd be a bit mean), back in the days when I was just starting to re-embrace my reading nerd, after years of it falling to the wayside because of mandatory school reads.

Reading it back felt like such a different experience. I was surprised I'd liked it so much before – fangirled over it that badly – and that I hadn't been bothered by the parts in it that would make me eyes roll into oblivion these days.

Thing is, it's not the book's fault. It's not you, book, it's me.

I've changed a lot over the years, formed some strong opinions on what I do and don't like, and have developed a cliché-odometer that dings at the smallest of things. All, in all, I think I've just got higher standards.

I feel like I want more from my books these days; things past me didn't care about. Or that I'm more fussy about things I don't want; things past me wouldn't have minded.


But I also think the biggest culprit for my change of heart is this: I've read a lot of good books.

I've read books that have fascinated me and wowed me and left me completely speechless (yes, this does happen). Books that are so magnificently well-written that finishing them is something I never want to do.

So it's almost like I'm grading on a curve now, not just rating books on how much I liked them, but on how much I liked them compared to books on my List of Awesome.

I might read a book now and say, "It was good but, well, it's no Dream Thieves" and so that book might not get the five-star rating it could've earned from past me, who had not yet discovered Maggie Stiefvater (and so had not lived). 


Do you do the same? Have you ever changed your opinion on a book after re-reading it? Do you think our tastes just change over time? Or are those awesome books sky-rocketing our expectations?



 



Allie is a Pimm's-obsessed reader, who dreams of road tripping over America, learning to surf & becoming fluent in all the languages of her heritage (which, sadly, does not include Elvish). If she's not reading or blogging, you can find her catching up on Teen Wolf, or reigning supreme with Scrabble/Mario Kart. Stalk her on twitter, instagram or goodreads.


66 comments:

  1. Well actually...yeah. Kinda at least. See, when I was younger, I was reading this vampire book and LOVED IT. So, 2 years ago, when at the bookstore, I saw the book and thought why not? So I bought it and re-read it but kinda gave up after 80 pages because I didn't what was apecial about it anymore. :/ Still, it's not a bad book.

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    1. Yeah, it's not that they're bad, it's just that they're not . . . good any more. Like the magical from when you read before is somehow missing. It's a shame really!

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  2. Yesssss. *cries* I tried reading some of my old childhood favourites, like books I would absolutely 100% swear by and. and. and. I DIDN'T EVEN LIKE THEM. I was frustrated and disgusted and kind of though the writing sucked. :( I haven't tried it again. I prefer to keep the image of perfection that I have of them. Heh. I think it's okay to change opinions about books. I mean, we're human. We have this deep ingrown need to be unpredictable and irrational. *nods* Absolutely.

    OH. AND BE PROUD OF ME. I have reserved Daughter of Smoke and Bone at my library.

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    1. I think this is why (with the exception of The Raven Cycle books) I just don't tend to re-read things. Because I'm worried the spark won't be there and I'd rather have fond memories (sounds like something you'd say after a breakup :P).

      AHHH I'M SO PROUD. Tell me what you think immediately after you're done. Or tweet the feels!!!!

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  3. This is why I'm terrified of re-reading books. I've done it a few times, but there are a lot of books that I'm worried about re-reading in fear that, now that I have so many more awesome books to compare them to, I just won't see their appeal anymore. And that would be SO SAD. I'd rather keep the nice memories of reading them the first time than accidentally ruin them...right?

    I don't know. I'm hoping that I'll be able to get over this at some point, because there are a few that I really want to read again. But we'll see if that ever ends up happening!

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    1. That's definitely a good attitude to have, and the one I tend to go by. I feel like once I've read a book and formed opinions on it, I shouldn't go back and read it, just in case. What matters is at the time that I read it, I loved it. It meant something to me in that moment, so I'd rather not ruin that. Except for books that are genuine favourites, which are the standard by which I compare everything lol. I'll read them again!

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  4. Oh yes this happens to me too. I remember that once upon a time I loved Hush, hush series and I even had books. But then I though about it and realized how much I'd hate it now. So I gave my books to the library and recently I was there and a 12 yo girl was returning the first two and she loved it. She was so happy. I'm glad that someone is enjoying it now. But I have change.
    But yeah, on the other hand there are some books that I will never change my feelings for. I have reread that epilogue of Clockwork Princess and again felt everything I felt a year ago. So amazing.
    I love your post! :)

    Tanja @ Ja čitam, a ti?

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    1. Oh my God, Hush Hush! *whispers* This may, or may not *mysterious look* have been the book I was talking about *ahem*

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  5. I think for me a lot of it is just me maturing as a person and as a reader. I mean at one point I liked Twilight, didn't it? But if I re-read it, I'd hate it. And I wonder if it was just me going through that hormonal stage and idk.. finding Twilight to be totally awesome (although I never really liked Edward). I am not sure that for me it's about having read more awesome books and having my expectations sky rocket although that does play a part.. I just think it's more about growing up and maturing and realizing you don't have the same tastes and expecting more from books. Know what I mean??

    FANTASTIC DISCUSSION POST, ALLIE. I've been wondering about this lately and I am so glad you decided to share this with us!

    Rashika @ The Social Potato

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    1. But by that logic, that'd be we were getting mature. HOW IS THAT POSSIBLE? Are we grown-ups now? *Gasps* ;)

      Seriously though, I do agree. I think our tastes are always evolving and changing as we get older and become more experienced in not only life, but in our reading. Once we explore new genres and see all the different things out there, I think we tend to be more 'selective' when deciding which books are amazing and which aren't. Which, actually, is quite a good thing in some ways!

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  6. Dude yes. This happens so often! Although a lot of the time for me, it's paired with book amnesia, so I'll come across a book mentioned on a blog and go- oh, I've never heard of this book before! And then go on GR and see that I've given it 5 stars and I'm like whut. Don't even remember anything about it... Quite often if I then go on and reread it, I won't like it as much/actually really dislike it....

    I think it's definitely the fact that as you go on and read more books, you start comparing- and sometimes the original books just don't seem as unique or as good anymore.

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    1. Haha, that happened to me with The Sky is Everywhere! Everyone was raving about it and I read the blurb and was like 'this sounds really cool' and then I looked and saw I'd already read it ^^ and I don't think I even liked it LOL.

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  7. My opinions change on books I've read in the past all the time, mainly because of ratings. I read beautiful Creatures last year and really liked it, but I know, I know, that I feel differently, I don't even need to re-read it to know, I just do. I think personally, it's because I've become a better reader. I can see things from both an enjoyment level and a level of book kind of level. I've read almost three times as many books this year as last year and I think it does affect your feelings. There's books that will always be good because they're in your heart, but we all change, we all mature, it's what we do. This is a great post Allie, really, really good :)

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    1. Exactly. We can't help but change as our reading experiences change and become more varied. When you haven't read as many books, you're bound to be more easily impressed because you just haven't seen a lot of what's out there, but once you've really broadened your horizons and explored a lot of genres, it becomes impossible to be so lenient.

      I think after reading books like Daughter of Smoke and Bone, or Dream Thieves, I'm always going to be comparing books to them because they're books that have really shaped my reading experience and cemented my tastes.

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  8. I think it's because we grow as readers too. I have it all the time. I loved Twilight when it first came out but if I re-read it now I know I'll hate it because I've grown a lot as a reader since then. (That and I see how bad it is now.)

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    1. Yeah, quite a few people are citing Twilight as an example and I agree. I think that's the same for a lot of books that tend to focus more on the plot and less on the actual writing. Truth is, books with vivid prose that truly touches you, are the ones you can never tire of. Books that are just there for the drama and angst, tend to get old.

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  9. Yes! In HS I adored Clive Cussler's Dirk Pitt series-I lived and breathed these books, lol. However, I recently picked up a new installment and I ended up DNF'ing it. I realize now how repetitive the writing was in each book and there's really no depth to any of the characters. It's an adventure series and I think this is a pretty common issue with this genre.

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    1. Is it more character-central or plot-driven? If it's plot-driven then I think I get that (the book I was referring to was plot-driven). If the characters are what you fall in love with, then I think it's harder to dislike a book, because they mean so much to you. But if it's the action that you liked once, it's easier to fall out of love with a book, because as a more mature reader there just probably isn't enough substance

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  10. It is so true and strange at the same time! I feel like the more that I read and the more that my mind opens up to different writers and genre's some books that I originally started with lose some of their luster. Even though when I read them I thought I couldn't possibly love anything else more!

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    1. I think the only books I'll never fall out of love with are the ones that have changed my views as a reader and really helped me explore genres I may not have before. They're the reads I've truly fell for and have become my 'standard' to compare things by. Books I've simply really enjoyed, for no specific reason, that aren't 'unique' in any way, are the ones I think I'm more fickle with

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  11. Yup, I'm pretty sure that happens to me! I wanna say it's because my taste and standard in books change the more I read ;) Sometimes, a book is lucky and on a second read/attempt I end up loving it more, so that's kind of nice, haha.
    I sort of rate on a curve too, because when I give a 5 star, I always think "hmm, do I love this as much as my other 5 star reads?".

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    1. I always think like that! Like, if I rate it as a five then I'm saying it's on par with 'so and so' book and then I have to think . . . is it really on par with that? It's quite interesting, because it makes you wonder if there are different 'levels' of five-star ratings.

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  12. This is so true, it's like back then when we loved Twilight when it first came out because there was nothing else like it, but if we were to go back and re-read it it would be terrible. I guess it's kind of evidence of how fiction and our thoughts and expectations are constantly changing with the times you know?

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    1. Definitely. I think we're also influenced a lot by what other people are reading and liking, so when people are negative toward a book we once loved, we might go back and read it with a different perspective, taking into account the things they hated (that we never picked up on before) and so it could sway our views a bit. Outside opinions are surprisingly influential

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  13. This is the reason I don't reread books from years ago, because I'm afraid that I'm much more critical now and I don't want to spoil the love I have. I already have it with some books I read 3 years ago, because a while back I changed a lot of ratings because I felt they weren't accurate anymore.

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    1. That's my feeling exactly. I'm just going to look back fondly on old books and not waste any more time re-reading them to see if I still feel the same. It just leaves me conflicted a little guilty!
      Yeah, I definitely don't want to be changing ratings. I've only ever done that once for a book, and I really didn't enjoy doing it.

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  14. I absolutely adore your blog design - it's so cute!
    I don't re-read a lot but I have been trying to re-read more. I think every reading experience will be different because your situation will be different. Things will have happened since you read the book the first time to make you think differently about the plot, characters, etc.

    Great post! xx

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    1. Thanks, Lucy! I'm actually in the process of going through a redesign, so this look isn't long for the world lol.

      Yeah, I think that's the biggest thing: every experience changes you, even just the experience of time. You're never going to be the same person, or feel the same as you ma have done years ago. Everything is fleeting, including the way certain books may make you feel in certain times of your life

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  15. I think once you have read a really well written book, genre or series it can be hard to go back those books you once loved when you realized that they were nothing compared to others you have read since then. It is all in the timing. I have had that happen to me recently as well and it was disconcerting and I felt bad almost especially when I recommended it to someone and then realized it wasn't the 4 stars or 5 stars I had originally rated it.

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    1. The recommending thing is actually the worst! I always feel very . . . weary when I recommend books I've read, and so now I only tend to really 'push' the ones I know will always be absolutely awesome. The ones I've read and feel like they've altered all of my future reading experiences. With ones I just liked or thought were good, I'll just be like 'yeah, it's pretty decent'. No pressure that way!

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  16. This has happened to me a few times, but only with books that I loved as a kid. About a year ago, I decided I really wanted to go back and read some of the books I ADORED as a kid, just to reminisce. And after I read them - I was really disappointed. They weren't as good as I had thought they were. Especially this one about bees - it was so bad! And I was so disappointed. And kind of annoyed. Because now I don't look back these books with love and reverence, I kind of look back with a 'oh they weren't as good the second time around'. Since then, I have learned not to go back and read childhood favourites, haha.

    As for general favourites, there are only a select few books that I'll go back and re-read, and I have only re-read two books since book blogging and neither of them were favourites and my feelings for them didn't really change.

    But the ones I used to go back and re-read stayed the same. They were still the pieces of perfection that I had always thought they were. However, like I said - I haven't re-read any favourites since I started book blogging. And when I started book blogging, I started reviewing - thinking of things that make a book good and bad. I wonder if this will change my thoughts? As well as the fact that, like you mentioned, I have read SO MANY good books since book blogging - will I think the books I read before book blogging are still as fabulous? I hope so. I wouldn't like to think that book blogging has changed my thoughts on books *that* much.

    But I suppose I will have to wait and see until when I finally get around to re-reading some of my favourites!

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    1. I think with children's books, that's kind of understandable, because it's hard to get back into that mindset. Though we can say, 'oh they'll always have sentimental value', that's honestly just not true most of the time. What meant something to you then, doesn't have to mean something to you now. Loving a book is not always an exclusive feeling that spans over the years no matter what.

      I agree about only re-reading genuine favourites that'll never be anything but that. Though you could argue those might change too, I think now that we're older and kind of know who we are and what we like, and are 'experienced readers' (whatever that means), the favourites we choose now will remain favourites.

      I do think blogging has changed my opinions a bit, more because it's made me set my standards a bit higher. I've explored so many genres and stories I never would've thought to and so, in a way, the books I read before blogging won't ever compare, because I wasn't reading books that ever had the capacity to compare. I was playing it far too safe and now I feel like I'm really branching out, which is essential if you're looking for those true gems :D

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  17. I completely agree with this Allie! The thing is, as bookworms, we read so many books and I think the problem is that sometimes we find a book that's better than a book we considered to be a "5-star" read; and our expectations shift accordingly. That's just one scenario, but there's definitely the whole changing of tastes, maturing (ha!), etc, etc.

    I think this is a brilliant post because I've been wondering about this too! Thanks for sharing! <3

    ~ Zoe @ The Infinite To-Read Shelf

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    1. That's exactly it! I may 'think' something is five-star and then I'll read another book after and think, 'now THAT is five-star' and it'll make me reconsider everything I thought about the first book. Thing is though, maybe different books are five-star reads for different reasons. Maybe there are even different levels of five-star reads, so two books can both be a five, even if one is better. Because they're both good in their own right, you know?

      And haha, yeah, the maturing thing . . . I shouldn't have even said that because WHAT A RIDICULOUS CONCEPT ;)

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  18. I've had this same realization before and it's actually kind of surprising. It made me quite afraid to look at those books that are in my favorite shelves because I might downgrade them to the meh section. I never thought the day would come when I'd be so selective of books I would read and love. Like you, I totally compare books sometimes. I get all, 'This is not as wonderfully written as Daughter of Smoke and Bone or this is not as epic as say this book from this genre', but I rate books independently anyway. Fortunately, books that I've read after I started reviewing are still as good or even get better as I reread them (w/ the exception of Harry Potter since I read this before I got into reviewing). The same cannot be said about Twilight but I do get its appeal, I think. Haha.

    Fantastic post, Allie. You made me think deeply at 10:30 AM. That's a new kind of record for me. :D

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    1. I think the best thing to do is just to remember that you loved those books once and so the rating was true at that time. They were worthy of those five stars when you gave them, and that's what matters. Maybe you wouldn't rate them the same way now, having read other 'superior' books, but it doesn't make them any less deserving of that initial rating, because in those moments after you read them, they clearly had a great impact. It kind of goes with that whole 'look back fondly' thing. That's why I'm not a fan of changing ratings as my tastes change, because I just think it's a little unfair, almost as if the book earned the stars the first time round and I'm asking it to continually keep proving itself to me as I grow older lol. Which is a bit harsh :P

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  19. Oh my goodness, YES! I was just thinking about this the other day! Especially books in a series, which I'd read at least a year or two ago, and am now feeling completely apathetic about the release of a new book. And now that I am reading said book, I really could not care less, whereas two years ago, I was in love with the series. It's exactly like you said- I have read so many amazing books since then, that it made me love this series less. When I'd read it, I hadn't been reading a lot, so it was good since I didn't have a ton to compare it to. But hundreds of books later, there are simply better books out there!

    I think a test of a truly great book is that no matter how much time has gone by, and no matter how many other books you read, you still love it (ahem, The Hunger Games, I could reread it right now and have ALL the feels). GREAT post!

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    1. I think are definitely those 'greats' that are cemented as books you'll always love, but then it does make you think . . . didn't we think that about those other books we've re-read and now don't like? Who's to say in ten years we won't be looking back at these favourites and wonder why we ever like them? It's strange to think how much our tastes can change, even if nothing particular about ourselves change, just by the experience of reading more broadly.

      I hope none of my current favourites ever end up being disappointments, but if they do it'll be quite fascinating to look back and see how strongly I felt about them and how that all just ended up disappearing!

      Humans, by nature, it seems, are fickle bastards ;)

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  20. Good discussion post. I try not to judge things against favorite books, but sometimes the book is just TOO different for that. However, I think it's normal to not like all the same books you used to love. You're growing up and reading more...especially as a blogger...and you find that you're a bit more critical or interested in different things now.

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    1. It's not a conscious thing I remember starting to do, just I realised lately that I had been doing it for a while and was like, 'oh . . . well, I guess that's how I rate things now' haha.

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  21. I have always wondered the reverse, if maybe a book I once hated could turn out to be a book I would really enjoy now. But I do know that I have had this experience before, where I haven't enjoyed a book as much the second time around. I can't think of any books that I really, really loved that I then ended up not liking when I went back and reread them though. I have read so many amazing reads this year though, I am sure this would probably affect my opinion if I read some of my past 4 star reads, most would probably be more like 3 stars.

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    1. That's actually a really interesting question!!!! I've never thought to re-read a book I disliked the first time, but it stands to reason if your tastes change so much you dislike a once-loved book, then the reverse could definitely be possible too. I'm actually really tempted to read a not-so-great book from before and see what, if anything, has changed . . . food for thought!

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  22. Great post girl. This does make me think about the days where I handed out the 5s a little easier, and these days hardly at all

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    1. Same here! I was a lot more generous in my ratings back in the day, when I was just starting out in blogging. Now I'm less likely to give five stars to just any old book

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  23. This always happens to me! And I think it's for the same reason you've mentioned. I've discovered so many wonderful books that other books that I USED to love seem mediocre in comparison. I don't even want to read my old books anymore because I feel like I may hate all the books I loved before. xD

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    1. I think it's best to just have the good books as a fond memory and not try to re-read them in the hopes they'll make you feel the same. Maybe it's because we can never re-live the moment when we read it the first time, and how it affected us BECAUSE it was the first time we read it. If we read it a second time, the books becomes predictable and so less likely to elicit the same feels.

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  24. We do read so much that our expectations change and the bar is constantly being raised. That's part of why I don't re-read, I'd rather leave the initial feeling intact.

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    1. Don't fix what ain't broke! AKA . . . don't re-read books you've already read :P

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  25. Oh, definitely. I remember back in High School I was crazy over James Patterson novels. Like I would rent each and every one of them books every week and thought they were the best thing to have existed in the history of books. Now fast forward to now. My tastes have grown, I've read more, and a lot of them were good and deserving to be dissected in a literature class. I go back to my James Patterson novels and I'm like, "WHY DID I EVEN LIKE THIS" I mean they weren't bad... but compared to the ones I read in the same genre, it was definitely lackluster. Our tastes definitely change over time and once we get to experience better books, because our standards keep getting higher. It's like, it's possible for a book to be THIS good, so why isn't that other book like it? Does that make sense? Haha.

    Faye at The Social Potato

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    1. Definitely makes sense and that's exactly my train of thought these days. It's like, I'm not asking for impossible standards because some of the books I've read before have reached those standards. So it can be done and now I expect it to :P (basically, I'm becoming a book snob haha)

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  26. Hm, I don't think this has ever happened to me before! It's weird, since I read so much, but not very weird at the same time, because my favorite books are the ones that are pretty old (like Harry Potter and Percy Jackson and The Hunger Games), and they have huge fanbases that are so easy to get caught up into, so negative reviews are scarce.

    Honestly, the only book series I can think of that I have fallen out of love from is something kind of lame -- Nancy Drew by Carolyn Keene. I have many happy memories of the times I read those books, because apart from HP, they were the only books I would read for a long, long time, but when I ask myself if I would ever read it now, the answer would be probably not. The love for them isn't there anymore, either. And it isn't because I dislike the books anymore -- it's just as you said: I've moved on and read much better books (though YA hasn't been doing very well in the mystery genre, unfortunately). So while I'll always think back to my Nancy Drew days fondly, I doubt I'll ever feel the same love I did for the books back when I was younger, and I don't think I feel very regretful of that. Because if I hadn't started book blogging, or hadn't started reading more books outside my comfort zone, I definitely wouldn't have come across many of my current favorites!

    Right now I'm just praying that this doesn't happen to me with Harry Potter, because that series is basically my life and it would physically hurt if I started to dislike them. D:

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    1. You know, I never actually read the Nancy Drew books! Everyone always raved about them, but I never picked them up for some reason, and now I feel like the moment's passed and I'm a little too old for all that!

      I think Harry Potter is one of those eternal stories that'll never lose its shine, simply because it was just so unique and always will be. I don't think there'll be another series to rival HP on world-building, character development and pure originality.

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  27. This is why I generally don't reread books, especially ones I've loved. I've found that rereading just ruins my experience. That sounds so negative, I know! But I'm far more critical on a second read than on the first. There are some books I have to reread for various reasons, but my preference is to pick up a new book and make a new memory!

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    1. Not at all – it does ruin the experience because no experience will ever be as good as the first one. The first time you read a book it has this certain effect, because you're reading it for the first time. When you re-read you know what's going to happen, so the shine wears off a bit!

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  28. YESSS to this post! I've definitely looked back on books I previously loved and wanted to cringe a little bit about what I tolerated. I've also been afraid to re-read some favorites because I don't want to lose that original love. I think that reading more GOOD books definitely plays a part, as you said. But also, if I read too much in one genre they all take on a silliness and sameness that overshadows all of them - the general PNR plot is a good example - awkward new girl who attracts all the hot guys. Really? As an avid disliker of love triangles, I can think back on books that I liked previously and I KNOW elements would be painful for me today. I also think I'm more emotionally attached to characters, which would make other themes tough. I went through this huge Thomas Hardy phase in HS and college, in which I read at least 6 or 7 of his book. But I can't believe it, because they are hardly ever happy and characters experience and do the worst things. But on the other hand, isn't it the best when a book DOES live up to the first time you read it?!

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    1. Cringe is definitely the right word here! Sometimes I look back and thinking . . . 'what was I thinking?' because it seems crazy my tastes could've changed that much and that I didn't used to get annoyed by things that would have be fuming now. I guess I just didn't want as much from my books back then, which I suppose isn't a bad thing because it allowed me to branch out a lot more and not look down on certain genres.

      Do not get me started on love triangles though! BAH. I can't read books with those. At all. Nope. I was so annoyed when the Shatter Me series turned into a love triangle, because I was already halfway through it :/

      There are some books that still live up to the magic of that first experience; for me, that's The Raven Cycle books. They haven't lost their edge and every time I re-read them I notice so many new things.

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  29. I definitely have to agree. Looking back at some of my books on Goodreads, I remember liking them A LOT but all I have to do is think of them again now and I don't see why I liked them so much. Not because I forget them, but because with a little perspective, I realize that they weren't all that spectacular. I think, just like you, that my reading tasting have matured and I've also read better books. Some of the ones I liked before aren't as original as I used to think they were, or with a bit of time I've realized that that relationship wasn't too realistic or sweet, or that that MC was pretty whiny, actually. But too look on the positive side, this just helps me to find better books!

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    1. Books I used to love definitely were not original either. They were bog-standard romances, or overly simple and trite dramas, with no real substance. At the time, I thought they were the most marvellous things, but after reading books now that are so unique and detailed, I know I wouldn't react the same if I read those oldies again.

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  30. Fantastic, fantastic post! I definitely think falling out of love with books is something more common than we actually realise. As you mentioned, it's not as if you pick up an old favourite and suddenly think it's TERRIBLE, but it is sad to realise that you don't love it as much as you used to. I think it's just a case of maturing and tastes changing. Also, newer favourites tend to make older favourites pale in comparison. At least some times.

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    1. THANK YOU :D <3

      Yeah, it's more of a sad realisation that you just don't love it any more, or that it just doesn't hold that same magic for you. It's not bad . . . it's just lost that spark. Which, in a way, is worse!

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    2. You're absolutely welcome! <3

      Yes, definitely! I've also wondered the reverse before: if a book I didn't like so much the first time round, I might enjoy more a second time.

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  31. I rarely re-read books, so I've never had the exact experience you described at the beginning of this post, but I absolutely agree with the idea behind it. The more I read, the higher my standards get, and for me, that manifests in more DNFs and some unfair comparisons. I share the problem you mentioned in the last paragraph - ever since I read Rose Under Fire, I haven't been able to read any book set at a Nazi concentration camp without thinking "It was good... but it wasn't Elizabeth Wein." Part of me hates it, can't stop saying "But that's not FAIR to the good-but-not-as-good books!" but you really can't help it. It's just a natural side effect of reading as many books as we do, and I guess it helps us appreciate the really great ones more.

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    1. I totally agree, because I NEVER used to DNF, but now I do it with ease because I've got to that point where I don't like wasting my time on a book I'm not enjoying when I know I could be reading something else sensational.

      Maybe it is a little unfair to all those other books out there, but I just can't help but thinking that if the amazing books could do it, then it is possible and so the 'pretty good' books should be able to do it too!

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  32. I used to love EVERY. SINGLE. BOOK. I. READ. I'd say I'm a critical reader now and my tastes have changed drastically--angel books used to be my favorite, but now I've drifted far away from those books. So I guess there are plenty of books that I gave 5 stars to that I'd probably rate much lower if I re-read them now... Which is probably why I hardly reread books. I'm scared to not love them anymore. >_<

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    1. I've only ever read, I think, one angel book/series, which is the Penryn & the End of Days one. So they're still a novelty to me!

      I think the fear of losing that special feeling when you read a book is the reason I'm not re-reading either. I feel like I don't need to because I read and loved that book once, and now I should read and love other books and not try to 'test' if an old favourite lasts.

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  33. Love this post! I totally agree, I reread a book recently and thought what was I thinking? Though sometimes you do get books you reread and they are as good as the first time you read them :)

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